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map 2020-11-14 093707 & map 2020-11-13 135846

Feedlots in North America, Texas. 2020. Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas. 

The other image of food.

There is an idealized image of our food production system. Cows grazing on green fields, fish in the oceans, fruits, and vegs being picked by happy people. The reality can't be any more different.

By 2050 it is expected the human population will increase to 9 Billion. The demand for meat has already tripled in the developing world in four decades, while egg consumption has increased sevenfold, driving a huge expansion of large-scale animal operations. The demand for more crops to feed livestock is one reason experts say we’ll need to double-crop production by 2050.

How to feed 9 Billion humans without destroying the planet? The debate between traditional local farmers and new technologies and bio-engineering is still going on. 

But researches have already shown that It would be far easier to feed the nine billion people by 2050 if more of the crops we grew ended up in human stomachs. Today only 55 percent of the world’s crop calories feed people directly; the rest are fed to livestock (about 36 percent) or turned into biofuels and industrial products (roughly 9 percent).

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map 2020-12-04 130600, Fish farm in Greece. Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas

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map 2020-12-02 213211 & map 2020-12-04 132009.

Shrimp and Fish farms in Egypt and China. 2020. Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas. 

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map 2020-12-04 093116, Fish hatchery, North America. 

Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas

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map 2020-12-04 134236, Greenhouses in Elejido, Spain. Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas

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map 2020-12-04 132804, (Detail) Greenhouses in Elejido, Spain. Images are stolen from Google by Raquel Rivas